If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right. Switch to Accessible Site
Click here for a statement on the Coronavirus
We are Open and accepting Telemedicine appointments. Click here for more information

(410) 764-7044
6506 Reisterstown Road, Baltimore
1205 York Road, Lutherville
6305 Belair Road, Baltimore
7809 Wise Avenue, Dundalk

Same day emergency appointments
Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

The medical term for the Achilles tendon is the calcaneal tendon. It is located in the back of the leg, and connects the calf muscles to the heel. It is considered to be one of the longest tendons in the body, and is used during walking and running activities. An injury to the Achilles tendon may occur as a result of not warming up adequately before beginning an exercise program. Achilles tendonitis or a rupture can cause severe pain and discomfort. Patients may be susceptible to experiencing this type of injury with existing flat feet or tight calf muscles. There are prevention techniques that can be implemented which may help to reduce the risk of incurring an Achilles tendon injury. These can include stretching before any type of exercise is pursued, in addition to wearing shoes that fit correctly. If you have pain in your heel or if your calf muscles are stiff, please consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat Achilles tendon injuries.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Brian Kashan and Dr. Chanelle Carter of Plaza Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Baltimore, Lutherville, and Dundalk, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What are Achilles Tendon Injuries
Monday, 03 August 2020 00:00

The pain and discomfort that is located on the outside of the foot may be indicative of a condition that is known as cuboid syndrome. It can occur as a result of a partial dislocation of the cuboid bone, and may happen for a variety of reasons including a sprained ankle, wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, or running on uneven surfaces. A common symptom that patients experience from this ailment can consist of pain on the outer edge of the foot, and it is often worse while standing. Mild relief may be found when specific strengthening exercises are performed, and it may help to wear custom-made orthotics. If you have pain in this part of your foot, it is suggested that you speak to a podiatrist who will be able to treat this condition effectively.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Brian Kashan and Dr. Chanelle Carter from Plaza Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Baltimore, Lutherville, and Dundalk, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Cuboid Syndrome
Monday, 27 July 2020 00:00

Warts on the bottom of the feet, known as plantar warts, are a common condition. About 25% of people get plantar warts at some point in their lifetime, often during childhood or adolescence. Plantar warts are caused by the human papillomavirus, also known as HPV, and can be highly contagious. To prevent plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot in damp public areas, such as community swimming pools or water parks. Wear clean cotton socks and change them regularly. Inspect your feet and take extra precautions if you notice a cut or scratch, as these may make you more susceptible to infection. If you or someone close to you has a plantar wart, it is suggested to keep it covered with a bandage in order to avoid spreading the virus to others. To avoid the risk of contagion or infection, it is recommended that you consult with a podiatrist right away.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Brian Kashan and Dr. Chanelle Carter from Plaza Podiatry. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Baltimore, Lutherville, and Dundalk, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What Are Plantar Warts?
Friday, 24 July 2020 00:00

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Connect with us