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6506 Reisterstown Road, Baltimore
1205 York Road, Lutherville
6305 Belair Road, Baltimore
7809 Wise Avenue, Dundalk

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August 2020

If your child complains of foot pain and you take them to the podiatrist, hearing that they have been diagnosed with Sever’s disease can be frightening. Fortunately, Sever’s disease, or calcaneal apophysitis as it is sometimes called, sounds a lot worse than it really is. Rather than being an actual disease, Sever’s disease is an overuse injury. Simply put, it is an injury to the growth plate of the heel bone. Children’s heel bones are typically not done developing until the age of 14. As your child grows, new bone is forming in the heel’s growth plate, a weak area located at the back of the heel. Repetitive stress on this growth plate from participating in sports and activities that involve running and pounding on a hard surface, can cause inflammation and muscle strain. Your child may complain of pain in the back or bottom of the foot, fatigue, or pain while walking or doing sports. With the professional treatment, your child will soon be back on their feet. If you suspect that your child may have Sever’s disease, please visit a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Dr. Brian Kashan and Dr. Chanelle Carter from Plaza Podiatry. Our doctors can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Baltimore, Lutherville, and Dundalk, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

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Monday, 24 August 2020 00:00

What Is a Brannock Device?

The apparatus that is referred to as a Brannock device is an accurate tool for measuring your foot to determine your correct shoe size. When this is accomplished, the proper size shoes can be purchased. It is important for your shoes to have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. This may be helpful in preventing painful foot conditions from developing, such as bunions and hammertoes. Additionally, it is helpful to ensure that the ball of the foot lines up with the ball of the shoe. Shoes that fit correctly will feel good when they are tried on, and it is generally unnecessary to break them in. If you would like to know more information about how to purchase shoes that fit correctly, please consult with a podiatrist.

It is important to find shoes that fit you properly in order to avoid a variety of different foot problems. For more information about treatment, contact Dr. Brian Kashan and Dr. Chanelle Carter from Plaza Podiatry. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Proper Shoe Fitting

Shoes have many different functions. They cushion our body weight, protect our feet, and allow us to safely play sports. You should always make sure that the shoes you wear fit you properly in order to avoid injuries and deformities such as: bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, plantar fasciitis, stress fractures, and more. It is important to note that although a certain pair of shoes might be a great fit for someone else, that doesn’t mean they will be a great fit for you. This is why you should always try on shoes before buying them to make sure they are worth the investment. Typically, shoes need to be replaced ever six months to one year of regular use.

Tips for Proper Shoe Fitting

  • Select a shoe that is shaped like your foot
  • Don’t buy shoes that fit too tight, expecting them to stretch to fit
  • Make sure there is enough space (3/8” to ½”) for your longest toe at the end of each shoe when you are standing up
  • Walk in the shoes to make sure they fit and feel right
  • Don’t select shoes by the size marked inside the shoe, but by how the shoe fits your foot

The shoes you buy should always feel as good as they look. Shoes that fit properly will last longer, feel better, and improve your way of life each day.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Baltimore, Lutherville, and Dundalk, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Sunday, 23 August 2020 00:00

Do Your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Monday, 17 August 2020 00:00

Do I Have Morton’s Neuroma?

Morton’s neuroma can occur when nerve tissue swells or grows abnormally, causing damage to the nerves. Morton’s neuroma specifically affects the intermetatarsal plantar nerve found in the foot. Some symptoms of this condition may include a burning sensation in the ball of your foot and tingling, or a numbing feeling in your toes. The most popular symptom related to Morton’s neuroma is feeling as if a pebble is stuck in your shoe. For a proper diagnosis, please consult with a podiatrist if you believe you’re experiencing symptoms of Morton’s neuroma.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Brian Kashan and Dr. Chanelle Carter of Plaza Podiatry. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Baltimore, Lutherville, and Dundalk, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

Where Is the Achilles Tendon Located?

The medical term for the Achilles tendon is the calcaneal tendon. It is located in the back of the leg, and connects the calf muscles to the heel. It is considered to be one of the longest tendons in the body, and is used during walking and running activities. An injury to the Achilles tendon may occur as a result of not warming up adequately before beginning an exercise program. Achilles tendonitis or a rupture can cause severe pain and discomfort. Patients may be susceptible to experiencing this type of injury with existing flat feet or tight calf muscles. There are prevention techniques that can be implemented which may help to reduce the risk of incurring an Achilles tendon injury. These can include stretching before any type of exercise is pursued, in addition to wearing shoes that fit correctly. If you have pain in your heel or if your calf muscles are stiff, please consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat Achilles tendon injuries.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Brian Kashan and Dr. Chanelle Carter of Plaza Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Baltimore, Lutherville, and Dundalk, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 03 August 2020 00:00

Signs and Symptoms of Cuboid Syndrome

The pain and discomfort that is located on the outside of the foot may be indicative of a condition that is known as cuboid syndrome. It can occur as a result of a partial dislocation of the cuboid bone, and may happen for a variety of reasons including a sprained ankle, wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, or running on uneven surfaces. A common symptom that patients experience from this ailment can consist of pain on the outer edge of the foot, and it is often worse while standing. Mild relief may be found when specific strengthening exercises are performed, and it may help to wear custom-made orthotics. If you have pain in this part of your foot, it is suggested that you speak to a podiatrist who will be able to treat this condition effectively.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Brian Kashan and Dr. Chanelle Carter from Plaza Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Baltimore, Lutherville, and Dundalk, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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